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caveat emptor – /ˌkæviːɑːt ˈɛmptɔr/

March 13, 2014
tags: ,

It’s necessary to sometimes point out to potential job seekers that any teaching post advertised anywhere needs a thorough check – and that the only person who can really do that is the job-seeker. For one thing, only you know your own circumstances and your own preferences in location, culture and type of employment. You can’t rely on someone else to say “this job is absolutely  OK” – do your research and reach your own conclusions.

Aspects of a job that you HAVE to check are:

  • the contract – what exactly are you signing up for, and with whom
  • legalities – work permits and tax
  • the pay – how much is this in “real” money – and is it a fair rate for the location or country
  • hours – how many teaching hours – to what level – in what locations (will I be paid to travel to varying locations across a city, for example)
  • is preparation time and admin time reimbursed
  • benefits – accommodation, travel and bills – are these paid for – when – how
  • And add your own questions – ELTS CELTA graduates should have a full list of questions to ask from their CELTA course session on “Careers in ELT”

Remember – one great way to check on a job is to talk to someone already there – a reputable employer  will be happy to put you in touch, or use social networks to find someone.

If you end up in a poor situation that you failed to check out – one where you simply believed the information given to you with no checks being made – then there’s really only one person to blame – that’s you! Of course, there are responsibilities for the employer to give the correct information, but the work of getting it right for you starts with you.

Thankfully, most jobs abroad go really well, and the experiences and cv boost are both well worth it. We have a constant series of “good news” emails to relate from happy past Swansea CELTA trainees who have worked abroad. Just do the checks first!

As they say, caveat emptor.

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